I don’t want to be a killjoy BUT…

Did you know that when you publish 17 blog entries within the same hour that you may possibly annoy your followers? I like to visit each follower’s blog at least once every 2 weeks. I have 1300 followers to visit.  However, I’m finding it difficult to view everyone in my Reader because 5 bloggers published 20 times within the same hour.

If you have good content (and some of you do have good content) then you don’t need to spam the reader. Just publish once with all of your beautiful photos in the same blog. For example, if you are photographing a hotdog today then post all 20 hotdog photos for today in one entry. Do not publish 20 different blog posts about the same hotdog on the same day. Now if you eat a different hotdog tomorrow then write another blog post about that hotdog. Its on a different day and therefore it is a different hotdog. Plus you will be publishing once a day instead of 20 times that day.

I suggest that the most beautiful photograph be the first photograph in your blog entry. Usually the Reader is set up to where you can only see the first photograph of each blog. Therefore if you post the best photograph first then your readers will click on your blog to view or read more of that entry. I have some incredible photographers among my followers. Just please don’t spam the Reader because I will have to unfollow you. I need to visit all of my followers, not just the 5 that published 20 times each that day. I hope I don’t offend anyone. I love your photographs but I need to visit everyone who published today.

Hummingbird Moths at Lyon’s Arboretum

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There is a secret in Lyon’s Arboretum bromeliad garden.

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When I walked down the path I felt something wurrrrrrrrrrrrrr right next to my ear. At first I felt irritated thinking that I was under attack by a monster mosquito. However, I saw the blur of brown twirl around these purple mounds of flowers sprouting from the center of the bromeliads. To my surprise I discovered that resembled baby hummingbirds without feet.

It looks like it’s half hummingbird and half moth!  The hummingbird moths are insects that love all sorts of flowers. Today I found them at Lyon’s Arboretum drinking nectar from the brilliant bromeliad blooms. They use their tongue to lick up the nectar like icecream. I have to admit that the bromeliad blooms look tasty. (The reality is that they are unedible even though they look like candy.)

 

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They were hard to photograph because they were terribly fast.

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They came out close to dusk at Lyon’s Arboretum. For directions read: http://oahuhiking.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/bromeliad-garden-at-lyons-arboretum/

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Friendship Garden

This beautiful garden climbs up to a small hill with beautiful views. Look at the bottom of this entry for directions. Happy Hiking!

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Endemic Ilima

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Banyan tree native to India

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Directions: From H3 drive to Kaneohe -> Drive on Kaneohe Bay Drive -> Turn left on a small street called Kokokahi Place -> drive up the street until you see the gardens on the left. There is little parking so large groups are not a good idea. Enjoy!

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Hawaiian honeycreepers are in Peril-Why the native forest birds may become extinct.

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Originally posted on A Honey Creeper's Life.:

Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in a six-part series.

HAWAII-It is considered the “global epicenter of imminent extinctions”  for plants and animals; just since the 1980s, 10 unique birds have disappeared. Among some of the most threatened species are a native group of forest birds known as honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) that have evolved in the absence of avian malaria. 

As you can see (below), these beautiful and fascinating birds have evolved  a remarkable array of distinctive morphologies.

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Family Drepanididae (Hawaiian Honeycreepers). *Note* Not all species are shown.

[VIDEO] Are you looking to see what a Purple,Green, Shining, Golden collared or Red-legged honeycreeper looks like?

Hawaii has more extinct birds than anywhere else in the world

Hawaii has more extinct birds than anywhere else in the world

Honeycreepers have suffered catastrophic decline in recent decades due to:

  • Habitat loss
  • Introduction of alien plants and animals
  • Avian disease

The accidental introduction of the of the southern house mosquito Culex

View original 405 more words

Ho’omaluhia Botanical Garden

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(Directions are below the last photo.)

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Directions: From town drive on the Pali Highway -> Make a left at the first turn to drive through Kaneohe -> Stay on that road until you see Luluku Street -> Turn left on Luluku Street -> Drive all the way down the road and through the gates. Enjoy!

 

Valley of the Temple Waterfalls

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For more information visit www.facebook.com/oahuhiking

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Many changes have occurred on this trail. This trail is on private land and therefore not entirely legal to access. Also,  the landowners have the privledge of rearranging the landscape. You will see before and after photos because the trail is on private land . I believe they are building more graves and scenic places. The trail was demolished in the process of building more graves and scenic places. However, the natural part of the location was not lost.  Thankfully they are not erecting buildings or walls to totally block our view of the mountain or waterfall.

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This is the “after” picture. Also, I might add that if you visit this part of the property to please be quiet and mindful of the families. This is a grave site and mourning families shouldn’t be bothered with noise and excessive cars. There is a parking lot located at Byodo Temple for your convenience.

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Its still beautiful even though the trail is gone.

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Valley of the Temples

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Valley of the Temple Directions:

Take H1 Honolulu East. Once on the freeway, get into the far left lane. Follow the sign that says (63) North, Exit 20A Likelike Highway. This exit appears on the right. Stay on this highway. You will pass through the Wilson Tunnel.  Take the Kahekili exit (83) on the right. Get into the left lane . You will pass through five stop lights. Valley of the Temples is the left turn.

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You can see the Koolau waterfalls behind the Byodo Temple.

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There are lots of peacocks that frequent the temple’s grounds.

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Friendly black swans are also at Byodo Temple.

 

Lulumahu Waterfall

For more information about Lulumahu Waterfall visit www.facebook.com/oahuhiking

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